About

Noah Kippley-Ogman studies the history of fundraising for higher education and its effects on American colleges and universities.

His dissertation is a study of the way that routine higher education fundraising grew as a profession over the twentieth century as colleges and universities both public and private increasingly relied on private gifts to balance their annual budgets.

At NYU, Noah has taught and been a teaching assistant for courses including The University from Ancient Athens to Corporate Ethos, Introduction to American Education, Culture Wars in America, Religion and Public Education in an International Context, and Learning and the Meaning of Life. He has been a leader of the Graduate Teaching Collaborative in the History Department and the Steinhardt ASH Doctoral Forum and has served in professional roles in NYU’s Heyman Program for Philanthropy and Fundraising and the Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders. He has also been a research assistant for President Arthur Levine of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation and for NYU professors Bethamie Horowitz, James Fraser, and Catharine Stimpson.

Noah earned a Bachelors of Arts with distinction in Natural Sciences and Social Sciences from Shimer College in Chicago and is a native of Saint Paul, Minnesota. Before coming to NYU, Noah was a fundraising professional at educational organizations in Chicago and fundraising consultant to organizations in Chicago and New York City. He has served on governing and advisory boards of The Bronfman Fellowship, Danebod Family Camps, and Shimer College. Noah is among the collaborators planning Outer Coast in Sitka, Alaska.